Mission

Our Mission is to protect small animal species and their eco systems. We specialize in road ecology, tunnel permeability and breeding migration of herptiles.  Small terrestrial animals of every class (specializing in amphibians) are captured via the Hobbs Active Light Trigger (HALT) camera trap. The HALT camera trap is a precision tool (100% detection) capturing images of ectotherms for data analysis. It is important to us to protect our natural world. Nature needs our help!

Michael T. Hobbs

Michael Hobbs has a rich history of education accompanied by related occupations. He served in the United States Navy as a Plane Captain operating throughout East Asia onboard the USS Midway, ultimately becoming an aviation electronics technician and settling in Silicon Valley.  He is a full time single parent of a very loving and exceptional son, and having been fortunate enough to travel the world, he has become increasingly concerned about threatened and endangered species.  Wanting to expand his education and explore environmental concerns, he obtained his M.Sc..  He is currently working as a consultant, designing solutions and capture critical data in the Bay Area.  He has several patents on the HALT trigger, which captures (day/night) images of amphibians, reptiles, invertebrates and small mammals.

Short CV

Publications

Hobbs, Michael (2019)  Drift Fence Camera Trap. United States Patent No.: US 10,258,029.

Hobbs, Michael (2018)  Tunnel Camera System. United States Patent No.: US 10,015,453.

Hobbs MT, Brehme CS (2017) An improved camera trap for amphibians, reptiles, small mammals, and large invertebrates. PLoS ONE 12(10): e0185026. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0185026

 

Hobbs, Michael Thomas (2013) Amphibian Mortality on Roads: A Case Study in Santa Cruz Long-toed Salamander Habitat. Master's Theses. 4389. 
http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/etd_theses/4389

Presentations

Western Section of The Wildlife Society. 2019 Annual Meeting. Tanaya Lodge at Yosemite, CA.

An Improved Camera Trap for Amphibians, Reptiles, Small Mammals, and Large Invertebrates. Michael T. Hobbs1* and Cheryl S. Brehme2. 1Wildlife Ecologist, Technologist, San Jose, CA, mhobbs2928@gmail.com; 2Western Ecological Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, San Diego, CA.

California-Nevada Amphibian Populations Task Force January 11-12, 2018.  Auburn, CA.

An Improved Camera Trap for Amphibians, Reptiles, Small Mammals, and Large Invertebrates. Michael T. Hobbs1* and Cheryl S. Brehme2. 1Wildlife Ecologist, Technologist, San Jose, CA, mhobbs2928@gmail.com; 2Western Ecological Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, San Diego, CA.

 

2014 ESA Annual Meeting August 10-15, 2014

Sacramento, CA.

Poster presentation: “Amphibian Mortality on Roads: A Case Study in Santa Cruz Long-toed Salamander Habitat” (#48057).

 

California-Nevada Amphibian Populations Task Force January 8-10, 2014

Pepperdine University, CA.

Amphibian Mortality on Roads: A Case Study in Santa Cruz Long-toed Salamander Habitat. Michael Hobbs* and Lynne Trulio. Department of Environmental Studies, San José State University, San José, CA.

© 2020 by

Michael Hobbs

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